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New Jersey Fosamax Lawyers

Fosamax (generic – alendronate) is in a class of drugs known as bisphosphonates used to treat osteoporosis and Paget’s disease. It slows down the process of bone breakdown in the human body, while increasing the mass of the bone. It also alters the cycle of bone formation, allowing for bone strengthening over long periods of time. Bisphosphonates are also beneficial in reducing bone pain from breast cancer and multiple myeloma. Actonel, Boniva, Zometa, and Aredia are also in this class of drugs and are commonly marketed as medications to help and prevent or treat bone loss in osteoporosis.

There are over 36 million women who use medications like Fosamax to prevent or slow osteoporosis. Since the indication of hormone replacement therapy causing increased risk of heart disease and breast cancer, more women are taking bisphosphonates at an earlier age.

Fosamax was originally approved September 29, 1995. In December 2010, the FDA released a Drug Safety Communication regarding the relationship between bisphosphonates and femur fractures. According to the FDA, people who take a bisphosphonate drug, such as Fosamax, may be at risk for an atypical subtrochanteric femur fracture. These fractures occur just below the hip joint. Fosamax users may also be at risk for a diaphysis femur fracture which occurs in the thigh bone.

This bisphosphonate drug has also been linked to osteonecrosis of the jaw (“dead jaw” or “jaw death”). Osteonecrosis is a severe form of bone damage in the jaw where the bone tissue does not heal after minor traumas. In dental procedures, patients are at risk when they take Fosamax. Most cases occur after tooth extraction and other dental procedures.

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury from a Fosamax side effect, you may be able to file a claim to recover damages associated with your condition. Contact a drug injury attorney at O’Connor, Parsons, Lane & Noble for a free no obligation consultation. You can simply contact us online or call 1-908-928-9200 or 1-800-586-5817.

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